Browsing: Sail Plan and Itinerary

Palm trees and Pelicans…finally!

For the first time we are feeling that we can slow down and enjoy the “South”.  Yesterday was reasonably warm and today it looks like it will be warmer still.    Seeing Palm trees and Pelicans is now a regular thing, so we must be headed in the right direction.

After we left Beaufort and the Homer Smith Marina and Fish processing plant, we continued South on the ICW to “Mile Hammock” Anchorage.   This is owned by the US Military and is a favorite for people traveling between Beaufort and Wrightsville.   Just about exactly half way.   I think by sunset there were 19 boats anchored.    We were lulled to sleep by the sound of light Artilery fire and other military operational sounds.    This part of the ICW is also used for live fire exercises and is sometimes closed for obvious reasons.   We saw several of the “Targets” scattered along the shore as we went along.

We also passed by a Navy base where they were practicing vertical take off and landing with their Jets.    Reminded me of Arnold Schwarzenegger  “Your fired!”   Those Jets.    Very loud.

As there were several bridges that operated on a scheduled we have learned the art of keeping in a neat row without moving but very carefully using FWD and REV and a tiny bit of rudder to maintain our position in line abidst the wind and current.    A couple of small z drives attached to a geo stationary controller would work well here!

 

Sunset at Mile Hammock Anchorage
One of our pet peeves has become hedges that remain unclipped. This is one great example. We have found that whenever we walk we usually end up going single file for part of the way. I guess walking is just not as popular as it once was.
We saw this sign in Belhaven. Thought is was quite a mix of businesses. This was only half of it. There were more things written on the back. When we went inside along with the Christian Book Store, which only sold Bibles, was a pool table, some arcade machines, Candy, Snacks, The services of a Noterary and Bondsman, Avon and a number of other various, completely unrelated services and good! Got to hand it to the proprietor, he was making the most of every opportunity!
We past hundreds, maybe thousands of docks and houses in the last couple of days. At least 1/4 of the docks and houses showed some sign of damage from Hurricane Florence. There was about 20 feet of water above the norm, but we noticed that most of the homes were already built up about another story, either on posts or a full basement beginning at ground level. The docks often had a roof or a widows walk atop them but many were twisted and collapsing.
Notice the blue tarp on the roof of this house. This was a regular site. You really could not look at a group of houses without seeing several like this.
Here we are anchored behind two other recently retired Cannuks. Wrightsville Beach, which is the recreational area of Willimgton NC. It is a very popular free anchorage. We even had a visit from the Town Police this morning asking how long we were planning to stay. I suspect they have had issues with long term liveaboards in the past. They took a picture of our boat and every other boat in the anchorage and went off on their patrol.
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Recap fro Easton to the Great Dismal Swamp

We are in the south now.   Virginia that is.    Let me recount the Journey from the time we left Easton (accross from DC) to our entering the Canal known as the Dismal Swamp.

Spending a few days in Easton was a good battery recharge (Literaly as I needed to purchase some batteries for our electrical needs).   It was now time to move on and press south to find some of that elusive warm weather that has been teasing us.   We make a series of hops down the Chesapeake Bay and are now “in the Ditch” as they say.   No more waiting out bad weather warning (we hope).

The first day was delayed a bit as there was a small boat advisory that kept us in Easton until about noon.   That did calm down and we cruised down the Trend Avon River and out into the Bay.  Having only a half day we only went about 20 miles to a place called Solomons Island.   We were able to anchor in a harbor and get fuel that next morning and head out again.

From Solomons we went to a place called Reedville where we went up a creek and anchored in a nice protected basin as yet another cold front was moving through and we would need to stay put until about 10 or so.   As we were coming in we noticed that there seemed to be the remenents of some kind of industry there.   There were also some very large fishing vessels there with small tenders that looked like they were in some kind of seining operation.   As val researched the community we found out that it was and still is a huge fishing community with a significant ocean going fleet.    There were two Smoke stacks there.   One had been demolished and the other (still standing) had a plaque on it.   This may have had something to do with the fish processing industry.

See

Home

From Reedville we sailed most of the way to Fishing Bay, another beautiful anchorage that we did some ziging and zagging to get into.

 

View as we leave Fishing Bay, by the Dawns early light.

After leaving early we put in a full day and arrive at the Hampton Public Piers where we take a Slip, have a drink in a Brew Pub on the Dock, visit a museum and watch “First Man” on an iMax screen.

There is talk of some more snottty weather coming our way and some of our neighbors are talking about staying on in Hampton for two more days to wait it out.    I see that there is going to be a bit of a break the next day before it returns to Gale force so we decide to make a break for it and head out accross Hampton Roads, through Norfolk harbour and onto the Elezebeth river and then to the Dismal Swamp Canal.   It sounds long but it was only 20 miles.   The first ten were against 20+ knots on the nose with a 5 mile fetch.   Slowing going and keeping a sharp watch as we are in the home of the Atlantic Fleet for the US Navy.   We have never seen so many Navy Ships.   Some in use, some mothballed, some getting built and some getting rebuilt.

After the lock we moored to a bulkhead and met a couple from Montreal whe also just retired and are also headed to the Bahamas!
This definitely says Dismal and Swamp!
The Lock doors are closed and up we go

After the Elizabeth river was Deep Creek which leads to the lock that lifted us up about 9 feet to the level of the Dismal Swamp.     We locked through and are tied to a free dock for the night.   Tomorrow we head down a very long hand dug cut.   Google Dismal Swamp, there is loads of info on it and its connections with the Civil war.

History

 

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Warmer Days.

From Staten Island down there has been a significant change in temperature, thank goodness. We have put in long days trying to get more south and to spend a few days with the Finlays ( our son in laws brother Dave and his family). I will say the days have been long but warmer. Even with that the Jersey shore just about did me in, so I’ve decided to raffle my ticket on the Tevah off in 1 week increments if you’d like, to travel back to NB from about New York – north. I’ll keep you posted. 😬

The interesting things that I have observed is the water had changed to a greenish colour off the New Jersey coast, then back to a greyish colour again and is much warmer than our dear North Atlantic at its warmest. We also picked up a hitchhiker on the second day sailing in Jersey, a cute little swallow. He was pretty tired when he arrived and stayed with us until we were coming into Cape May. It’s interesting that we all need to take free rides when we are tired it’s just most of the time we don’t recognize that we are exhausted early enough and we push on. I have to say that the Psalmist seemed to understand his state of mind so much better than we do. Ps 40: 1-3. He hears my calling out, tiredness, answers and walks with us. Thank God!!!!
All is well on the ‘small craft’. The Galley Wench and the Captain I think have lost a little weight since when we are to shore we need to walk everywhere which is a nice change from when we are on the boat. It hasn’t been every day but very frequently we get our steps in! Life is good and ‘til the next entry, blessings.

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Where are we now?

 

 

I have not written in a few days as we have had a challenging time in navigation the last several days.    At the moment we are in the Delaware river heading for the C and D canal.   That will take us around to the Chesapeake Bay by the end of today.

In our last blog we were sitting in Great Kills Harbor having Thankgiving dinner and waiting out yet another small craft advisor to end.   A small craft advisory is issued when winds and waves are in a predicted state as to be hazardous to “small craft”.   Just so you know we are a “small craft”.    I have been in these conditions a number of times and believe me, you don’t want to be there.

After several days it did pass and we set out for two of the worst days in the cruise so far.    This was the Jersey Shore.   It is 100 miles long and all of the harbours along the coast are difficult to enter, even in calm conditions.     Since we did not want to spend the night at sea, we had to enter a Harbor about half way.   Even at that it meant a long couple of days.   The obvious choice is Barnagett, which because of the challenge entering the inlet is known as “The Bitch”.   We did enter it in very good conditions and it was still a bouncy entrance with seas breaking beside us and current and eddies sworling around us.    Of course as usual there are fisherman calmly standing on the breakwater casting their lines.    There were also many small fishing boats near the inlet as this must be the best (most dangerous) place to actually catch fish.    The sail down to Barnagett was with the wind on the nose 10-15, but this was the best weather window I could find, because the next day it would be behind us.      We spend a restful night and then it was out the inlet and down the shore again for another long day, but this time with the wind behind us.   While we traveled significantly faster the ride was just as bumpy and you had to wedge yourself between solid objects to keep from being tossed around.

We enter Cape may as the sun was beginning to set.    The next morning I decided for a less challenging day, so we slept in a bit, went over to Utches Marina to fuel and to walk to a store to get a few supplies.   We set out to go up Delaware bay at about 10.    It took the whole day to get half way up to the Cohanssay river.     It was a bit challenging navigating over numerous shoals  as I tried to make a direct route, dodge the crab pots and avoid the strongest currents.

At dusk we entered the river and slept well.

This morning we set out up the now, Delaware River, toward the canal.

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4 days and 3 nights was enough

So after a 3 hour sail in windy choppy swelly water we have arrived in one of the prestigious sailing ports on this coast.    We passed 2 12 meter yachts as we entered the inner Harbor, and as we walked up the hill to the grocerie store we saw the Church where JFK was married.     They were selling tickets on re-enactment displays and live music to relive the Camelot era event.  Hopefully tomorrow the Small Craft Advisory will be down and we can make the run to Mystic.

Two of the 12 meters that are normally here
One of the best loved America’s Cup 12 Meters, Intrepid

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Small Craft Advisory

Looks like it is just a speaker attached to the side of the cabin.
Can you guess what this is? Or how I took the picture?

There has been a small craft advisory for three days now and we have been stuck on a mooring in a very tiny harbor with no access to any civilization.    I talked to a few locals by phone and they basically said don’t bother to come ashore unless you have a car.

When we were in Portland we visited Hamilton marine and got a new stereo.   This one has an aux input, Bluetooth, satellite radio and will even answer your phone for you.   It collapsed three sketchy devices into one that actually works well.

I also bought two external marine speakers as we could not hear the music without turning it up really loud in the cabin.   I knew at the time that I would have to set aside at least a half day to actually install the speaker properly.  I will describe the process of getting the speaker wire from where the radio is mounted on the starboard side to the port side outside position.

  1.  Tie fishing weights on a piece of string to make a “fish” to get the wires down the inside of the slats on the starboard quarter berth.   Toss the weights down behind and hope it finds its way to the bottom.
  2. Drill a whole (close to the hull) through the deck of the quarter-berth.  The rule with drills and boats is that you must always to be aware if there is water on the other side of where you are drilling.   This is to be avoided, especially below the waterline.
  3. Tie the speaker wires onto the string with the fishing weights and pull them down to the quarter-berth and then stuff them through the hole.
  4. Contine to pull the wires through the underside of the berth, past the battery, past the engine, up the port engine compartment bulkhead, and then eventually over to the space under the combing where access to the galley and the mount for the speaker will eventually go. (Outside)
  5. Drill a whole on the combing for the wire to be pulled through.
  6. Stuff a wire into the whole…. here is where it gets interesting. .. see pic 2.  The only way to actuall see where the wire should come through is for me to lay on my back on top of the icebox and slide myself athartship, until my head reaches the hull on the port side… then in a semi sit-up stick my head through a 9 inch hole and look…. *&^%$#$%^& can’t see it.
  7. redrill the hole deeper.
  8. )(*&^%$%^&*((still can’t see it
  9. Redrill the hole at a different angle
  10. Success
  11. After this it was simply a matter of crimping the wires and now we have one nicely installed outside speaker with no visible wires.

time Required. 4 hours

 

I also installed a couple of hooks for kitchen stuff.  Made a shelf for the portable VHF and charger.

 

The other speaker will be much easier as all I need to do is install the bracket!

 

The sail plan from here will be to leave early tomorrow and sail for Mystic River, bound eventually for Mystic Seaport, which is the largest Maritime Museum in the US.   We will likely anchor tomorrow at Fisher island and make the run up the river first thing in the morning.   They have a two for one promotion for the dock at the museum that includes the price of admission.   We will do provisioning there as well.

See http://mysticseaport.org

 

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Family Territory

Here is a picture album from the last couple of days.  From the time we entered the Cape Cod Canal until we holed up here in a snug little Harbor in Rhode Island called Sakonnet.

A great view of the facilities at Sandwich on the Cape Cod Canal
The brand new office. Last year was the 100 anniversary of the canal, which was built by the US Army Engineers.
Take care of your Sandwich’s lest they get written up.
Walking back from church we came accross the HQ
There are also firemen in case your toaster gets out of control
Approaching the famous and picturesque train bridge. Kind of like the tower bridge in London
Out into Buzzards bay
View into Phinney Harbor as we pass
View at the moment. In Buzzards Bay heading for Phinney Rock which marks the entrance to the Harbor where I bought this boat in 2011
This marks Phinney Rock. Rocks like this usually get named after the person who first found (hit) them
John and Marjorie Lok, the fine folks in South Dartmouth Harbour that we bought Tevah from in 2011. We met up with them at the New Bedford Yacht club and then welcomed them onboard for a glass of wine and sharing of memories.
The last couple of days since we crossed cape Cod every breakwater has people fishing. There are also sport fishing boats around us all the time. The big boats are after Bluefin Tuna while the folks on shore and in smaller boats are after strippers
We are currently anchored beside this beautiful and new Hinkley
Sakonnet Harbor, where we tucked in to get out of the near gale force winds. We may be here for a day or two.

 

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We are not in Maine anymore. A three state day!

A swanky yacht club in Cape Anne. They wanted $75 for a mooring so we dropped the hook instead.

Our longest day yet, from The Saco River to Cape Anne in the Annisquam River 52 Nautical Miles.

 

It it was a great sailing day, although we motor sailed quite a lot of it.   Wind, waves and current were with us the whole day.

 

We have another great anchorage in the river tonight.   Tomorrow morning we will motor through the canal to Gloucester (perfect storm), get some fuel and then possibly do a short run to Marblehead or stay out for the coming gale .

 

 

 

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Back on line

St George the dragon slayer outside the town hall. Maryanne you need one these!

Yesterday after Church in St. George (Tenants Harbor) we headed down the coast to Pemaquid.   There are the ruins of a fort there that has British, French and American roots.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Colonial_Pemaquid_State_Historic_SiteThe write up was very interesting and we may get a chance to visit if the weather stays closed in.    We had no internet when we arrived except for a spotty open wifi signal called “Fitche Cottage”   This morning I got the idea to put the cellphone in a waterproof case and hoist it up the mast….and presto we have a connection.  Thanks Verizon!

Our plans this morning were to weigh anchor at 0600 and head toward Portland, but that will have to wait a bit until the fog lifts.   There are strong SW winds predicted so I am thinking that we may just stay here for the day.   … unless we don’t.

I will let Val tell you about the Church experience.  It was good and interesting too!   Oh, and the man overboard drill too, when we find the pictures…I think they are up the mast on the phone!

Speaking of Val I can tell you one advantage of having the Galley Wench on board is that you don’t look and smell like a pirate!  No chance!

 

 

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Val’s Summary of Week1

I will try to keep this as short and sweet as I possibly can as I give you my overview of my 1st week on Tevah. First of all it is the longest I have ever spent on this thing and so far I am doing ok. Last Thursday and Friday were mostly days of saying goodbye to friends and family as well as to our home and community of over 20 years. It was tough and exhausting. I have a confession to make I haven’t read any of Eric’s blogs so I’m not sure if I am repeating any stories but you’ll be getting my view of things.

The boat club gave us a warm send off on Friday evening and Sharon and Paul arrived at 6 am with coffee and banana bread from the Irvings. When we sailed out of the Harbour it was great to be escorted out by Ross Phinney and David Peer, and waved to from shore by Ruth Anne Phinney, Gerry and Pat Peer and Melissa Cape,it warmed our hearts, thank you. As we headed down the coast to St. Andrews it was weird to know it would be months before we would see them again,yet, in some ways I had the thought it was time to leave since I could see David Peer with his toque and gloves on that it was the right time for us to get out of town. It didn’t take me long to go and dig out my winter clothes that I had put aside when I plan on visiting David and Kait in Saskatchewan in November. We went out for some wings and drinks to the Red Herring with Kelly and Scott and a few of their friends. On Sunday morning we got up and went to church came back and decided to head off. (As you can see I am not as detailed orientated as Eric).

The mornings have been pretty cool, so much so the Captain has had to get up before the Galley Wench has any intention of getting out of bed to make breakfast, he also is good enough to make the first cup of coffee of the day. We are getting into a routine. Thanks Ruth Anne for the warm undershirt, it has been worn several times in this first week, It wasn’t far into the third day I kept thinking, “Are we there yet????” We were just in the US waters and getting ready to check in. I assume I will get a little more settled with a lot less real estate to clean and be in. I am working on my guitar playing and am tackling a Bach piece.  This sailing business depends on a smart captain,CHECK, no watches, CHECK and a happy helpful crew, working on it.

Day 4 we had rain, rain and more rain, so I cleaned the head, organized some things and spotted for Eric as he did a dive to clean off the prop. My job was to make sure he comes back up. CHECK! On Day 5 marked the longest I had ever been on the boat at any one time so now that is old news! We headed off to NorthEast Harbour having to motor the entire way. I started to get some breakfast down below and couldn’t do it, the boat was going up and down and side to side. Needless to say the wench was turning a few colors that demanded to flee above. It was a long hard day. Arrived in a decent time so that we were able to wash some clothes, have a shower and FLUSH a toilet instead of pumping the head like a crazy wench. So the time there was a nice break, we went out to supper and the next day we got supplies, met some wonderful people in Bar Harbour who were beyond helpful. It wasn’t just one person but several, looking out for us and making sure we got to and from our boat.

Friday the day couldn’t be more beautiful and actually call it hot. We sailed for about 4 hours and anchored in the beautiful, quiet anchorage of Perry Creek. This morning, Saturday, I cut Eric’s hair and no he will NOT be cutting mine. It was a bit of a foggy cold day as we sailed over to Tenant’s Harbour. You have to dodge the lobster pots, so in the fog Eric is on one side watching and I am on the other. (see I do, help in the sailing process) I felt like we were playing a reality like video game trying to dodge the buoys of the lobster pots, I imagined if we hit one we would sink and have to start over. It was not to be! As I was trying to pick up a mooring line I was leaning over to lift it up I caught the release handle on my life vest and the damn thing inflated with me bent over holding the mooring line. Eric had to come up and help finish attaching the line to the boat since I felt like the Michelin Man!!! I guess we will have to get a kit to fix that, and to think I don’t wear it most of the time. Oh well, we arrived safe and sound, we will stay here and go to church tomorrow then decide where to go next.

Thank you for following us and making us feel close and connected to you all. We love and miss you. We are listening to the news and know that Florence has made landfall, we pray for those souls who are experiencing horrific situations. The Captain will be safe and alert and the Wench will keep him happy with food and cleanliness. Stay tuned.

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